Now, I’m not saying that if you really love the hot tub life that this wouldn’t work for you. Me? I’m not really a hot tubbing kind of gal. Especially not in the middle of the house. The “spa room” wasn’t my speed and I knew I wanted to remove it. Much to the kids’ dismay, the ability to remodel this room was a make it or break it for me. Either the hot tub went or we didn’t buy the house. Thankfully, we made it happen and the story is quite remarkable!
Does your dining room need some serious decor assistance? I have seen so many lovely dining room decor ideas lately and quickly came to realize my own was downright dull. With only a table and chairs and your run of the mill hardware store lighting, my dining room was functional but far from pretty. Searching far and wide on Pinterest for some ideas, I quickly realized the best ones were almost all DIY! With the rustic farmhouse look being oh so popular, I knew I was really in luck. I found step by step tutorials for shelving, tables, centerpieces and wall accents, chairs, clocks and curious, plus a few other fun ideas I just had to share with you. If you are looking for some do it yourself ideas that will fit almost any budget or some crafty ways to express your creativity in your dining room, these awesome projects are perfect!
Ambience is everything. The use of a stained ladder holding up three ballroom chandeliers grace this in-home eatery. The butcher block “prep”-style dining table is surrounded by rustic whitewashed metal bistro chairs and covered in a miller’s sackcloth table runner. Spruced with painted gourds and a built-in buffet, this straight-line dining area gives edgy touches to the word classic.
A trio of neutral colors and subtle shapes make up the room décor of this fresh country look. A candlestick chandelier is the focal point hanging over a spindle leg dining table and matching two-seater bench. Two eccentric ladderback chairs grace one side of the table and two soft side chameleon chairs with pillows demand room attention on each end.
With Far Eastern elements and artistic ideas of rustic country designs comes an eclectic and emerging “junkyard” type of dining area. The true charm of this room, besides the hardy butcher-block type dining table, is the onyx pipe-metal lighting overhang, the two-door glass bureau buffet, and the ‘not-exactly-matching’ armless parsons and round back chairs, roughly unfinished but uniquely complete.
Start with a concrete idea of what you want the dining room to be at the end of the design process. At this point, be as wild and imaginative as you can. And then, like carving a masterpiece out of a block of wood, slowly chip away the ideas that don’t go well with the overall theme you are trying to pull. Keep refining and keep simplifying until you are left with a design that would make seasoned interior designers proud.

Cotton or linen fibers, brilliant sparkling glass, pewter highlights, and articulated wooden spindles give a well-appointed room a hint of authentic vintage-inspired flair. The proper balance, when mixed with cross back chairs and chairs covered in stitched tapestry designs, “clash” together in a harmonious mix that will make any throwback design an updated treasure.
Smaller spaces such as this one, when laid out and styled intelligently, can still be made to be good examples of dining room design. This coastal style dining room employs wooden floorboards, bleached lumber and wood for the dining table and chairs, as well as carved wood for the side tables in the room. A navy color palette of white wainscoting and molding on blue wallpaper also really sets the tone for the space.
DO direct traffic away from work areas. A common problem suffered by small kitchens is too many circulation routes, which, in turn, disrupts the primary activity areas, such as the sink, stovetop, and dishwasher. And with all that overly used space in the kitchen, the dining room suffers from lack of use. Combining the kitchen and the dining rooms into one spacious family room/kitchen is a much better choice for a formal lifestyle. Plus, by opening up the kitchen to the dining room, you can easily direct traffic away from high traffic areas in the kitchen, and maximize efficiency.
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