DO direct traffic away from work areas. A common problem suffered by small kitchens is too many circulation routes, which, in turn, disrupts the primary activity areas, such as the sink, stovetop, and dishwasher. And with all that overly used space in the kitchen, the dining room suffers from lack of use. Combining the kitchen and the dining rooms into one spacious family room/kitchen is a much better choice for a formal lifestyle. Plus, by opening up the kitchen to the dining room, you can easily direct traffic away from high traffic areas in the kitchen, and maximize efficiency.

The table and chairs act as the focal point of your dining room, but show the rest of your space some love, too. "Do something unexpected," advises Rachel Bliefnick, founder of the design blog This Is Our Bliss. "Give your ceiling an interesting paint treatment, or put punchy pillows on your dining chairs and then layer a bold rug over your existing one."
To reclaim your dining room from papers and bills, "you need to figure out the logjams that are creating clutter and handle those with portable solutions," professional organizer Lorie Marrero says. For example, if you pay bills at the table, get a rolling cart; if the surface doubles as a work desk, get a caddy for your office supplies. That way, come dinnertime, you can move your mess out of sight. For a cheap remodel, a fresh coat of paint on the walls (or floor!) can work wonders, or switch out tablecloths, rugs, or other accent pieces for a five-minute update. Quick tip: Before you buy any big furniture, measure and outline its dimensions in painter’s tape to make sure it won’t disrupt the flow of the space. Ready to get started? Check out these gorgeous dining rooms for all the inspiration you need.
DO use cohesive design elements. Just because you’re combining two rooms that were once “separate” doesn’t mean you can keep them completely design-independent of each other. The best designers will tell you to pick a few cohesive elements and integrate them in all spaces now connected by your open floor plan. For example, similar colored trimmings or accent colors throughout will create a connected aesthetic and prevent rooms from competing with each other.
Now, I’m not saying that if you really love the hot tub life that this wouldn’t work for you. Me? I’m not really a hot tubbing kind of gal. Especially not in the middle of the house. The “spa room” wasn’t my speed and I knew I wanted to remove it. Much to the kids’ dismay, the ability to remodel this room was a make it or break it for me. Either the hot tub went or we didn’t buy the house. Thankfully, we made it happen and the story is quite remarkable!
With Far Eastern elements and artistic ideas of rustic country designs comes an eclectic and emerging “junkyard” type of dining area. The true charm of this room, besides the hardy butcher-block type dining table, is the onyx pipe-metal lighting overhang, the two-door glass bureau buffet, and the ‘not-exactly-matching’ armless parsons and round back chairs, roughly unfinished but uniquely complete.
The approximate costs and value of a typical Dining Room Remodeling project are summarized below. Use higher estimates for larger metropolitan areas and the lower estimates where home prices are below the national average. Adjust costs for substitutions or refinements in the last section. For size differences of up to 25%, scale total costs in direct proportion to the size of your project. Use the adjusted costs as a basis for setting a material budget and for comparing contractor bids (if you choose to have a professional perform the work).
Exposed wooden rafters and wooden beams are great for creating roomy Mediterranean spaces such as this one. The natural texture of the wood goes well with the clay floor tiles. A seemingly contradicting traditionally styled dining table set and glass chandelier surprisingly goes well with the whole aesthetic and creates a classical luxury vibe in the space. Dining rooms with French doors bring in an extra sense of ambiance and beauty as shown here.
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